About Wine – Qvevri and Qvevri Wine Museum

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The Qvevri and Qvevri Wine Museum in the historic village of Napareuli, in Georgia’s Kakheti region, is the first and only museum in Georgia dedicated to Qvevri and Qvevri wine-making. Thousands of years ago the people of the South Caucasus region discovered how to transform wild grape juice into wine by leaving it to ferment in … Continue reading

About Sights – Alaverdi Cathedral

Alaverdi Cathedral is the second tallest religious building in Georgia

Alaverdi Monastery (Georgian: ალავერდის მონასტერი) is a Georgian Orthodox monastery located near Telavi in the Alazani-River valley in Kakheti region. Founded by the Assyrian monk Joseph Alaverdeli, the monastery dates to the 6th century but the present day cathedral replaces a smaller church and was built in the 11th century by Kvirike III of Kakheti. … Continue reading

About Celebrations – Georgian qvevri wine-making method added to UNESCO Heritage List

Two Georgians At Marani by Niko Pirosmani

In 2013, the traditional Georgian qvevri (kvevri) wine-making method was recognized by UNESCO as part of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The making of wine in qvevri is the oldest known method of wine production and it was from Georgia that wine-making in qvevri spread to Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and beyond. Qvevri are handmade from a special clay … Continue reading

About Celebrations – Rtveli (Georgian Wine Harvest and Festivities)

Truck Full of Grapes

Rtveli (Georgian: რთველი) is the traditional vintage (the process of picking grapes and making wine) accompanied by celebrations that mark the end of the agricultural cycle for the year. For centuries, viticulture has been of great economic importance to Georgia. Today, there are more than 175,000 acres planted with vines. The vine also has an iconic and … Continue reading

About Wine – Introduction to Traditional Wine-Making

Chacha (grape skins, stems and pips) in a kvevri

Thousands of years ago the ancient people of the South Caucasus Region discovered how to transform wild grape juice into wine by leaving it to ferment in clay vessels called Kvevri, which they buried in the ground. It was from Georgia that the method of wine-making in Kvevri spread to Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and the rest … Continue reading