About Tbilisi – A Smart City

In his blog, “Smart Cities for Dummies,” published last November, Dan Hoornweg contends: “At its core a smart city is a welcoming, inclusive city, an open city. By being forthright with citizens, with clear accountability, integrity, and fair and honest measures of progress, cities get smarter.”

Tbilisi is fast becoming known as a smart city for the range of creative and innovative ways in which it is connecting with its citizens and visitors. Some of its recent innovations include:

Tbilisi Mobile Application

Tbilisi mobile application – “Tbilisi. Loves you” – is a guide to tourist attractions, restaurants, hotels, shopping and other useful information (text, photos and GPS). It’s a free application for iOS and Android mobile phone users.

The application provides contact information, map location and routes.

Free WiFi

By the end of 2012 a municipal wireless network plan will cover the entire city with free WiFi access.

Tbilisi will be the first capital city in the world to provide free WiFi access.

Emergencies Control Center

Tbilisi’s Emergencies Control Center unifies control of fire, rescue, medical emergency and patrolling services.

Emergency services are available 24 hours a day by dialing telephone number 112 from any mobile and fixed telecommunication network. Click here to find out more.

Electronic bus route indicators

Electronic indicator boards at bus stops display bus route information and arrival times in Georgian and English.

Tbilisi Public Service Hall

The largest public service hall in Georgia is nearing completion in Tbilisi and is expected to open in September 2012.

Tagged ‘Everything in One Space’, Public Service Halls are one-stop-shops delivering key services, such as public access to public records, issuing of passports and IDs and business registration. Because services are housed in one building there is no longer a need to visit different governmental offices. Click here to find out more.

Online Services

Tbilisi’s adoption and development of new technologies is removing bureaucratic barriers, making it easier for citizens to access services. Tbilisi City Hall offers a number of convenient online services. These are some examples:

Online Public Registry

Online Construction Permits

Electronic auctions “Purchase without risk”

These innovations demonstrate that Tbilisi City Hall understands that citizens are the people cities work for and improvements have to be designed around their needs.

Tbilisi is a smart city that is getting smarter! 

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Comments
16 Responses to “About Tbilisi – A Smart City”
  1. oregonmike98 says:

    i love the fact they are putting in a freecity wide WIFI system, even here in america we are having issues making that the norm. love your city, its on my list of 10 places to visit

  2. I wish our city had even half the I.Q. of Tbilisi!

  3. Bongo says:

    It looks so modern and beautiful – and then I think of all the ladies that sell things on the street. Such a contrast.

  4. The bus signs are the greatest things ever!

  5. Nel says:

    Georgia is definitely on my must-see places. 🙂

  6. Your city is living in the future as the rest of us head towards it! Impressive! 🙂

  7. eripanwkevin says:

    I’m very impressed to know that Georgia is getting lots of innovations! However those innovation must cost huge…….

  8. arthur says:

    I love the LED signs at the bus stops, but I wonder if it wouldn’t have been wiser to spend that money on a map of the bus and marshrutka system. As it is now, there’s no way to figure out how to go from place A to B without knowing all the bus lines by heart. The bus stops don’t have names, the routes are often only posted in the front window of the bus, and it’s very difficult to figure out itineraries that involve a bus transfer. All of this could easily be solved by naming the bus stops and creating a bus map, both of which should have been done before embarking on this flashy but not entirely thought-out electronic signage project.

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