About Food – Ajika with Walnuts

Ajika (Georgian: აჯიკა) is a hot, spicy paste used to flavor meat and fish dishes mainly in Samegrelo and Abkhazia. It is made with hot red peppers, garlic, herbs and spices. In appearance and consistency ajika resembles Italian red pesto. There are several types of ajika. In this recipe we show how to make ajika with walnuts. This type of ajika is spicy and very hot!

Ajika made with Walnuts and Red Peppers

Ingredients: 1 kilo of hot red peppers, 400 grams of garlic, 300 grams of walnuts, 100 grams of fresh green coriander, 100 grams of dried coriander, 40 grams of dried Summer Savory, 50 ml of oil, 150 ml of white wine vinegar and salt (at least 50 grams).

Ingredients for Ajika with Walnuts

Preparation: Put the peppers and herbs onto newspaper and leave overnight to thoroughly dry.

When ready to make the ajika, remove all of the seeds from the hot red peppers. CAUTION: Wear gloves to do this or your fingers and hands will burn from the capsaicin (heat producing chemical) contained in the peppers. Save the seeds – dry them and use them in other recipes.

Red Peppers for Ajika with Walnuts Recipe

Remove the skins from the garlic.

Garlic for Ajika with Walnuts Recipe

Crush the hot peppers. We used a meat grinder to do this.

Crushing Red Peppers for Ajika with Walnuts Recipe

Crush the garlic.

Crushing Garlic for Ajika with Walnuts Recipe

Remove the shells from the walnuts and crush them.

Crushing Walnuts for Ajika with Walnuts Recipe

Crush the coriander.

Crushing Coriander for Ajika with Nuts Recipe

Add the spices and salt.

Adding Spices to Crushed Ingredients for Ajika with Walnuts Recipe

Use your hands to thoroughly mix the ajika. CAUTION: Wear gloves to do this or your fingers and hands will burn from the capsaicin (heat producing chemical) contained in the peppers.

Hand Mixing the Ajika with Walnuts Mixture

Add the white wine vinegar and the oil and mix thoroughly.

Adding Oil to the Ajika with Walnuts Mixture

Serving: Serve as a condiment with meat and fish dishes. It can also be used in cooking.

Ajika with Walnuts

Enjoy your ajika!

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  1. […] red pesto. There are several types of ajika. In this recipe we used ajika made with walnuts. Click here for a step-by-step photo […]

  2. […] red pesto. There are several types of ajika. In this recipe we used ajika made with walnuts. Click here for a step-by-step photo […]

  3. […] for filling: 6 large, sweet red peppers, 200 grams of walnuts, 1 tbs Ajika (click here for a recipe), 2 cloves of garlic, 1 onion, 10 grams of fresh parsley, 1 tbs of dried hot red […]

  4. […] for filling: 6 large, sweet red peppers, 200 grams of walnuts, 1 tbs Ajika (click here for a recipe), 2 cloves of garlic, 1 onion, 10 grams of fresh parsley, 1 tbs of dried hot red […]

  5. […] 7 tbs of oil, salt (amount dependent upon personal preference), and 1 heaped tsp of ajika. Click here to see a step-by-step photo recipe for ajika (with […]

  6. […] I realized that restaurants in Russia seemed to charge for every little thing, in particular small servings of various sauces.  Supposedly it cuts down on waste, but I couldn’t help but recite to myself “profit margins” after every order of ajika. […]



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