About Travel – Tbilisi Metro

When it opened in 1966 the Tbilisi Metro was the fourth Metro system in the former Soviet Union (after Moscow, Saint Petersburg and Kiev). It consists of two lines with 22 stations on 26.4 kilometres of track.

The Metro is a great way to get around the city and avoid traffic jams. It is also convenient as trains run from 6:00 a.m. till midnight.

Metro

Tbilisi Metro

Tbilisi Metro

Until quite recently, entry to the system was by small plastic tokens which could be purchased at kiosks inside the stations. However, these have now been replaced by plastic smart cards that can be topped up.

There is a flat fare of 40 tetri (about 24 U.S. cents) but if you make more than one journey in a day the price reduces – the second journey will cost 30 tetri and the third 20 tetri.

Most of the stations are deep and reached by long escalators. It sometimes takes a while to actually get down to platform level.

The platforms are sometimes quite busy (an estimated 300,000 people use the Metro each day) but trains are regular and you rarely have to wait more than a couple of minutes.

Signs on the platforms and in the underground corridors are in Georgian script and English and when you are on a train announcements for arrival at each station are made in both Georgian and English.

However, if you are new to the system it is advisable to take a map of the system and count the stations as it is easy to get confused!

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