About Sights – Ujarma Fortress

Established by King Vakhtang Gorgasali in the 5th century, Ujarma Fortress (Georgian: უჯარმა ციხე) was the second capital of Georgia until the 8th century. King Vakhtang Gorgasali is believed to have died there after he was wounded in battle against the Persians.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

The fortress consisted of two parts: the Upper Fortress (the Citadel) located on the plateau of the rocky hill and the Lower City on the slope. A royal palace, consisting of a two-storey building, was located in the eastern part of the Citadel. The Upper Fortress was destroyed in the 10th century by the Arabian conqueror Abul Kassim but was restored in the 12th century by King George III who used it as a treasury.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

The fortress was originally surrounded by powerful protective walls with nine towers. Parts of the walls remain, together with several ruined towers that originally had tiled roofs.

Ruined Wall and Tower at Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ruined Walls at Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Tower at Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Tower at Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

In the middle part of the citadel is the two-storey Jvari Patiosani Church (Church of the Fair Cross) and reservoirs that once held water.

Jvari Patiosani Church.  Photo by Paata Vardanashvili, via Wikimedia Commons.

Jvari Patiosani Church. Photo by Paata Vardanashvili, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Because of its ruined state the Fortress might be overlooked when planning a visit itinerary but its historical importance and its beautiful views over the Iori valley make a visit worthwhile, especially as it is on the way to Telavi.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

How to get there? The Fortress is located about 45km from Tbilisi, on a hill by the Tbilisi-Telavi highway about 4 km north of the village of Ujarma.

How much does it cost? Entrance is free. Be prepared for a 600-700 meter uphill walk to reach the fortress.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Ujarma Fortress. Photo by Jonathan Cardy, via Wikimedia Commons.

Remember to include Ujarma Fortress in your visit itinerary!

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Comments
9 Responses to “About Sights – Ujarma Fortress”
  1. soffk7 says:

    Wonderful post!

  2. trechicuk says:

    You are doing Great job, Englishman! Thank you and God bless you!

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