About Food – Georgian Imeretian Cheese

Imeretian cheese from the Imereti region of Georgia is a very popular curd cheese made from cows milk. It has a soft and springy texture and a slightly sour, salty taste. It is a “quick cheese” maturing in just one or two days.

A typical handmade Imeretian cheese is shaped as a flat disc, 2.5 to 3.5 centimeters thick. It weighs 0.5 to 1.5 kilograms and contains 50% water and between 1% and 5% salt. Dry fat content averages 45%

Imeretian cheese is a favorite ingredient in Georgian cuisine, most commonly in the famous Georgian cheese-bread called khachapuri. It’s also great in salads and can be added to practically any dish that requires a mild melted cheese.

Georgia’s markets have mountains of these disc shaped cheeses but you can also buy them in little shops or kiosks and from people who make their cheese at home and sell it to passers by in the streets. The average price for a kilo of Imeretian cheese in Tbilisi is 6 lari ($3.69). It becomes cheaper in summer when milk yields are higher.

In a future post we will show how Imeretian cheese is made (step-by-step process).

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Comments
27 Responses to “About Food – Georgian Imeretian Cheese”
  1. andreashesse says:

    getting hungry already 🙂

  2. puzzle says:

    They all look so delicious, I’ld like to try some slices.

  3. eripanwkevin says:

    *drools* I looove cheese and all my family is!!! We prefer cow cheese to goat cheese! as goat cheese has strong smell! (we’re not good at it) . Imeretian can be made at home?? Not so difficult? Wow! Because I don’t think that we could find imeretian in Japan, I can’t wait to read how to make it in a future post!!! 🙂

  4. Jodi Stone says:

    I love cheese. And it seems reasonably priced too. 🙂

  5. Shary Hover says:

    Cheese makes almost everything taste better. I loved discovering all of the wonderful local cheeses when I lived in France. Looks like it’s time to start exploring the rest of the world through cheese, too. Delicious!

  6. Lisa Tanico says:

    Sounds delicious! The price sure is good, at least compared to what we generally buy in a regular supermarket here in the states. And I’ll bet this cheese is much better 🙂

  7. Diane says:

    Can this cheese be found in other countries as imports? I would love to try this and so would our little grand daughter who loves her white cheese.

  8. My mouth is watering!

  9. Chancy and Mumsy says:

    Oh, my!!! Bread and cheese two of my favorite foods. Very interesting post. Hugs

  10. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 🙂

  11. sean says:

    Are you still planning on posting a recipe for this cheese??

  12. Looking forward to the step-by-step recipe! Love cheese, and I’m quite intrigued by all those holes inside.

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  1. […] 300 grams of flour, 2 eggs, 300 grams of imeretian cheese (mozzarella cheese can be used), salt (quantity dependent on personal preference), 1 tsp of […]

  2. […] 300 grams of flour, 2 eggs, 300 grams of imeretian cheese (mozzarella cheese can be used), salt (quantity dependent on personal preference), 1 tsp of […]

  3. […] the filling: 4 boiled eggs and 700 grams of Imeretian cheese (or mozzarella […]

  4. […] the filling: 4 boiled eggs and 700 grams of Imeretian cheese (or mozzarella […]

  5. […] a lot. Our Lonely Planet book named seven different varieties (typically filled with Georgian Imertian or Sulguni cheese), though a few cheese-less ones substitute beans or meat & don’t really […]



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